Screening of Singletrack High

Press Release

For Immediate Release

Contact: Doug Bedient 775-690-9420 or Kevin Joell 775-233-5419

Incline Village, NV – The Nevada High School Cycling League is hosting a new documentary film about the sport of high school mountain biking. Recently added as one of the emerging leagues of the National Interscholastic Cycling Association, the Nevada League will be officially launching a league race series in Fall of 2016. A handful of demonstration races to get more kids involved will be planned in 2015.

singletrack high poster

“SingleTrack High”, produced by Pedal Born Pictures, follows a diverse group of high school student-athletes through the 2012 mountain bike racing season in the NorCal High School Cycling League. For Eliel, high school bike racing is a competitive outlet at the highest level. For Carlos, it is a means to escape the rough neighborhoods of South Sacramento. For Mackinzie and Allie, it is a chance to break into a sport traditionally dominated by the boys. These are some of the kids of “SingleTrack High,” Through their experiences, the film explores the positive impact high school mountain biking can have on boys and girls alike, from all walks of life.

Filmmaker Jacob Seigel-Boettner, who produced the film with his brother Isaac, said, “Even as former high school and collegiate cyclists, it was an eye-opener for us to see the impact that racing in the NorCal League has had on these kids. Being part of a high school mountain bike team has helped them find acceptance, accept themselves, and expand their worlds.”

There will be two screenings hosted in Northern Nevada. On Tuesday, December 2 at the Brookfield School, 6800 S. McCarran Blvd in Reno and Wednesday, December 3 at the Brewery Arts Center, 449 W. King Street in Carson City. Cost is $5 for adults with no charge for teachers or educators and kids under 18. Doors open at 6pm with the movie starting at 7pm.

Ticket sales benefit the Nevada League and 100% of the proceeds support our mission of providing safe, quality high school mountain bike programs for student-athletes and teams from public, charter and private schools throughout the state. Immediately following the movie there will be a presentation about the future of the Nevada League and how to get students, parents, coaches and teachers involved.

Who: Nevada High School Cycling League

What: SingleTrack High Film Screenings

When and Where:

Tuesday, December 2 @ 7pm @ Brookfield School, Reno

and

Wednesday, December 3 @ 7pm @ Brewery Arts Center, Carson City

Cost: $5 for adults, free for teachers and kids under 18.

Washoe Lake Night Ride

A few years of below average snowfall has rendered Washoe Lake a small pond. It doesn’t happen very often, but occasionally Washoe Lake will disappear completely in such conditions. After a recent hike out onto the dry lake bed to investigate the conditions, I realized what a fun ride it’d be to explore the area on fat bikes while we had the chance. It also happened that our first window to do the ride came about during the evening after the sun went down.

Washoe Lake Fall 2014
Daytime view of Washoe Lake

We parked in a small pullout along the south shore of the lake, turned on the GPS to help us find our starting point on the way back, and then scrambled down the bank to the high water mark. Just past a 6 foot wide sandy beach we pushed through some willows and down onto the weed covered lake bed. We pedaled through the crunchy weeds for a couple hundred yards, keeping an eye on the tires for stickers. Quickly we were out to where the water had receded more recently and onto the dried mud.

Washoe Lake nighttime Fat Bike ride

After riding for a time on the hard pack, we got out to an area where the mud was dried and separated by big cracks. Although dry on top, the cobble-like chunks floated on gooey mud underneath. It was a very strange sensation riding over this area, with each individual chunk of mud moving and sliding its own direction. The bikes felt wiggly, almost like all the spokes were loose. I actually had to stop once and make sure my tires hadn’t gone flat from the weeds before.

Washoe Lake nighttime Fat Bike ride

As we headed north, we could see the lights from the freeway to the west and Reno to the north. We also used the ground to keep us on track. If there were too many weeds, we knew we were drifting too far towards the shoreline. Too muddy, too close to the water.

Washoe Lake nighttime Fat Bike ride

Eventually we decided to break to the northeast. We weren’t sure how far we’d gone north, and weren’t sure where we’d end up. After a while, we began to see the silhouettes of the east shore trees. Just as we were discussing where we might be, a picnic table appeared in the darkness ahead. By chance, we had made a random straight line to exactly where we trying to go! We stopped for a rest and a beer at the picnic table before returning to the south.

Washoe Lake nighttime Fat Bike ride

The east side of the lake is quite a bit different than what we’d already ridden. Sand dunes border the shoreline, and the water is closer. With the lack of any recent weather events to smooth them out, the dunes were pretty choppy with horse prints. We headed southwest towards the water, but when we got too close, we were met with the repelling stench of stagnant water. We found a happy medium between the two zones, and had a nice cruise picking our way through the terrain.

Washoe Lake nighttime Fat Bike ride

Once past the lake area, the ground firmed up and smoothed out again. We decided to turn off the lights for a while and let our eyes adjust to the darkness. The moon was not up yet, so we almost had to look directly at the ground to see any detail. We kept this up for nearly a mile, then went back to lights mode.

Washoe Lake nighttime Fat Bike ride

As we approached the end of our ride, we began an effort to find our vehicles in the dark. Along the way we scared up a herd of deer bedded down in the bushes. It was pretty cool to see all those eyes watching us in our lights. I examined the tire tracks I was leaving, and realized  they were really faint. I decided it was highly probable that I had ridden right past our tracks from the beginning of the ride. Finally I had to consult the GPS to see where we were at, and discovered we had overshot the trailhead by about a quarter mile. We didn’t get as lucky as we did with the boat ramp!

Washoe Lake
Our Route

The loop we made was about 8.5 miles. Some of the terrain was like nothing I had ridden before, and riding it at night made it all the more adventurous. I’m glad we got the opportunity to do this ride when we did, because it won’t be long before the lake bed becomes too muddy or refills with water. If this looks fun to you, get out there and do it soon!

NICA High School MTB League

Some of you may have heard that Nevada has become the 15th League in the National Interscholastic Cycling Association!  This is a great opportunity for young cyclists to learn new skills and be a part of a sport that is well suited to the area we live in.

The Nevada League was founded by Doug Bedient who has been running a team out of Incline High School racing in the NorCal League for the past couple of years.  It was tough for him to take his team 5 hours away to race, so he took action.  The seriously hard work is done and now we are trying to recruit volunteers to help run the league.  We have several events coming up over the next few months with the idea that we will be running some “unofficial” races next fall and having our first official races in fall of 2016!

The first event will be a “Volunteer Recruitment Ride” on Sunday November 9th.  We will meet at the trailhead of the Peavine Trail System in Reno at 10am for coffee and introductions.  The ride is being lead by Luna Pro Rider Teal Stetson-Lee and will be a casual, conversational ride.  Anyone who is interested in volunteering in ANY WAY is encouraged to join us!  Even if you don’t ride much, this should be a fun and large group ride with opportunities to meet and ride with folks you may not know and find new friends for motivation.

We will also have info about the upcoming events aimed at recruiting student athletes, training volunteers and coaches, as well as what cities and schools are being invited to the league.  Our plan is to start at the middle school level to feed into the high school programs. If you have any interest at all in seeing our sport grow in the area, you should plan on attending.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me (Brent Ruybalid) at 775-721-2946 or brentnsandie@att.net

 

Blinky Man Halloween 2014

Halloween is on a Friday this year. This means you can stay up late and ride Blinky Man Halloween! Blinky Man is a costumed bike ride at night, with lights, through Carson City.

Blinky Man Halloween 2014

The meet-up spot is at The Westside Pourhouse at 110 West Telegraph Street from 5-6 PM on October 31st. The ride leaves at 6 PM, with fun stops throughout the night. All ages will be welcome for the early part of the ride. Decorate your bike with lights, and dress up in a costume. Halloween is the day you get a free pass to be as silly as you want and nobody will think differently of you.

If you haven’t done the Blinky Man ride yet, you need to. It’s a blast! Here are some photos from the Blinky Man ride we did earlier this year in the Spring.

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

Blinky Man Spring 2014

See you on Halloween! For the latest updates on the ride, follow Blinky Man Carson City on Facebook.

The Corral Loop at South Lake Tahoe

Last weekend we got up to South Lake Tahoe to check out some of the trails they’ve been building up there. To get to the trailhead, we headed south on Pioneer Trail road just past the Casinos, then east on Oneidas Street near Meyers. We followed Oneidas Street until it became a narrow Forest Service road known as Fountain Place Road. We parked just past the creek crossing at a trailhead parking area.

Corral Loop Area
At the trailhead

To get started, we rode up the paved Fountain Place Road. We didn’t see any other people pedaling up the road. All the other bikes we saw were in the back of trucks being shuttled to the top. Even though the road is fairly easy climbing, it looked like most people’s bikes were downhill biased. Eventually we reached the top of the Corral Trail and another parking area.

Corral Loop Area
Climbing Fountain Place Road

We weren’t ready to descend yet, but wanted to get off the road and onto some dirt. We decided to try climbing the Armstrong Connector Trail. It started off nice and easy with some long sweeping turns, but then started to climb over a lot of rocks that were much easier approached in a downhill direction. We kept going for a while, but then decided to turn around. It was definitely getting more technical than I wanted for my son and his new bike. We would have been better off keeping on the paved road to get to the top of the Armstrong Connector.

Corral Loop Area
Corral Trailhead

Corral Loop Area
Enjoying the view on the Armstrong Connector Trail

Corral Loop Area
Armstrong Connector Trail

Corral Loop Area
Negotiating a rocky corner on the Connector Trail

Corral Loop Area
Finishing the Connector Trail

We had some fun descending the connector, only having to walk over a few of the biggest rocks. Eventually we were back at the top of the Corral Trail. The Corral Trail immediately splits, and we took a right onto the Sidewinder Trail. This trail is named for the many twists and turns it makes as it snakes down the hill. Instead of methodically switchbacking down the hill as many trails do, there is an overabundance of turns on this run. Their purpose is purely for amusement, and keep the rider turning and guessing which way the trail is going to go next. It was a blast!

Corral Loop Area
One of the many turns of the Sidewinder Trail

Corral Loop Area
Finishing Sidewinder

We merged with the Corral Trail after finishing Sidewinder. The Corral Trail in this section is built full of jumps and big berms that give it a BMX/Pump Track feel. It was easy to see why so many people were shuttling up the hill with long travel bikes. The jumps are primarily tabletops with mellow take-offs, so even the novice can get a little air without too much fear of crashing. At one section, the trail split in two. Tabletops on the left, and a bobsled looking set of turns to the right. We couldn’t make up our minds, so went down the jumps, then pedaled back up and did the turns! All along the way we passed rideable features like big rocks and logs. It wasn’t until I passed them and looked back that I decided I could actually ride some of them. There is a lot of variety on this trail, with many challenges to keep you coming back to test your skills.

Corral Loop Area
Coming back up the Corral Trail to try an alternate route

I got some photos of my son going through the berms, then sped off to chase him down. I was starting to think he got way ahead of me, when I came around a shady corner to find him and the bike on the ground and a lone shoe on the other side of the trail. Someone was having a little too much fun and got crooked off the jump it appeared. We dusted him off and finished the trail.

Corral Loop Area
Fun berms on the Corral Trail

At the bottom of the Corral Trail, we explored the Railroad Grade Trail. As its name suggests, it’s a mellow trail with a gentle grade. We explored it a little ways, then turned around and headed back to the trailhead. Its a great beginner trail, or a good trail to connect to other area trails.

Corral Loop Area
Exploring the Railroad Grade Trail

These are some FUN trails. Although it’s possible to ride up these lower trails, they’re definitely designed with the downhill direction in mind. Climbing Fountain Place road is definitely the better option to make a loop. Had we not wasted energy on the Armstrong Connector Trail climb, we may have done another loop on the Corral Trail. I’m looking forward to trying these trails again, hitting the sections we missed, and explore the upper trails that connect Star Lake, the Tahoe Rim Trail, and Monument Pass.

For more information, see the Tahoe Area Mountain Biking Association’s trails page.

Buckland’s Station Loop

Just south of Silver Springs is Buckland’s Station, an old two story house built in 1870 by Samuel Buckland from the dismantled materials from Fort Churchill. This site was once a Pony Express stop, supply center for early pioneers and nearby Fort Churchill, and a former hotel. Today it’s a quiet old building in a park setting under the cottonwoods along the Carson River. I had a free afternoon recently, and decided to make the station my trailhead for an exploration loop around the mountains. My ride would take me up into the desolate desert mountains, along the railroad through Adrian Valley, through an old 1860s Army fort, and down the Carson River.

Buckland's Station Loop
Starting the ride at Buckland’s Station

I parked at Buckland’s Station, just north of the Carson River bridge on Alt 95 south of Silver Springs. To start the ride, I headed south across the bridge. It looks wide enough, but the 18 wheelers travel this route at full speed. The sound they make over the bridge as they pass you at 65 mph is a bit unnerving. I didn’t waste any time getting across, only glancing down at the now dry Carson River bed underneath.

Buckland's Station Loop
Buckland’s Station

Buckland's Station Loop
The mighty Carson River

Shortly after the bridge, there’s an old section of abandoned highway just past the campground sign. It’s a good way to get off the road for a bit of relaxed climbing. It rejoins the highway again after the curve, but the turnoff to the dirt road isn’t far ahead.

Buckland's Station Loop
Approaching the old abandoned highway cutoff

Buckland's Station Loop
Riding the abandoned highway

Buckland's Station Loop
Turning off Alt 95 onto the dirt road

After a short stretch of riding the shoulder of Alt 95, there is a gated dirt road that takes off on the west side of the road. After closing the gate behind me, I rode southwest along the road to a mining area. At first glance upon reaching the mine, it appears there is broken glass everywhere. The sparkling, though, is actually coming from all the selenite crystals that cover the ground in this area.

Buckland's Station Loop
Selenite Crystals

Continuing through the mining area, there is some fun terrain to ride through the open pits. After exiting the pit on the far side, I reached the highest point of ride. It was time for some downhill to the valley below.

Buckland's Station Loop
Riding through the mining area

Buckland's Station Loop
Fun terrain!

Buckland's Station Loop
Leaving the pits

Buckland's Station Loop
Heading down the canyon

At the bottom of the canyon I reached the cottonwood lined railroad tracks in Adrian Valley. The tracks run the length of this quiet valley, and there are long views to the north and south. According to the map, this spot is marked “Churchill (Site)”, although there are no visible ruins in the tall brush. Further to the south is Churchill Station Spring and Churchill Narrows. It looked fun to explore in that direction, but I pedaled on to the north towards the Carson River. I had to go around a few mud puddles, but I don’t remember any recent rains. It was strange for such a dry area.

Buckland's Station Loop
Looking south towards the Churchill Narrows

Buckland's Station Loop
North towards the Carson River

Buckland's Station Loop
Flat and easy terrain

Soon I reached an intersection. I could continue north along the tracks, or head east up into the mountains. Heading east over the low pass is the quick way back, but I wanted to see the river trails.

Buckland's Station Loop
Optional right-hand turn to climb over the mountain

Buckland's Station Loop
Looking back at Adrian Valley

Buckland's Station Loop
Almost to the river

I finally reached the bridge where the railroad tracks cross the Carson River. There were no warning signs, and the grating bordering the tracks seemed to indicate it was safe to cross. It’s a fairly short span with a good line of sight, but I hurried across nonetheless.

Buckland's Station Loop
The Bridge

Buckland's Station Loop
Exploring the river trails

After crossing the tracks, I was near the group area and campground of Fort Churchill State Park. When I reached an irrigation ditch embankment, I jumped onto a little path called the Stewart Trail, which to my pleasure was OK for bikes. I took a short loop through the cottonwoods, then took a water break at the group picnic area.

Buckland's Station Loop
Rest time

Refreshed, I headed over to the ruins of Fort Churchill. Built in 1861 to provide protection for early settlers and the Pony Express, Fort Churchill was once an active U.S. Army fort. It was abandoned nine years later, but the ruins are still standing today. Again, I was happy to see that bicycles are allowed on the fort trail, as long as they stay on the path and away from the ruins. I made a slow tour through the old buildings, stopping for vistas and photos.

Fort Churchill
Tour through the ruins

Buckland's Station Loop
Tour through the ruins

At this point in the ride, I was probably an easy 10 minutes from Buckland’s Station on the pavement. I thought it might be more adventurous, though, to cross back over the river and find the dirt roads I saw on the map I had studied earlier in the day. This decision definitely added some adventure to the ride, a flat tire, some scraped up legs, and easily a good hour.

Buckland's Station Loop
Flat repair

I followed a trail back to the bridge, but came to a dead end at a tree that I normally associate with thorns. I stopped and picked a different direction. As I got closer to the bridge, I noticed my front tire was deflating. I’m not certain if I hit a thorn or something sharp near the tracks. My tire was going flat quickly, though, so I wasn’t riding anywhere until I fixed it.

Buckland's Station Loop
The leaves are just starting to change

Walking my bike back over the bridge and over a small hill, I picked a work area on a sandy cliff above the south bank with a good view of the bridge and cottonwoods. I went to work changing my flat tube, and enjoyed the rest time in the shade. After I was up and rolling again, it was time to pick a direction of travel. Had I known the area better, the correct way would’ve been to go less than 40 yards through the brush to the southeast to pick up a good trail. But since the river was nearly dried up, I decided it would be more fun to ride the river bed.

Buckland's Station Loop
Ridable, but not real fun

I climbed down a steep river embankment, then rode through the slimy remains of the river. The sandy river bed was soft and full of cattle hoof prints. I was able to ride most of it with my fat tires, but it was slow going and not a lot of fun. I decided to abandon my plan when I got bored of the bumps, and headed to the south bank to find a road. There’s almost always a road near river banks, so I thought my chances were good.

Buckland's Station Loop
Bad route finding

As it turns out, I picked the widest stretch of brush to cross. I pushed my bike through the tall and tightly spaced brush, looking for a way through. I was thankful for my long sleeved shirt, but my legs were taking a beating. I kept going, thinking the road had to be near, and I finally reached the point where it was too far to go back anyhow.

Buckland's Station Loop
Back on a trail!

I finally reached the dirt road, very happy to be able to ride again! It would now be an easy ride back to Buckland’s Station. Along the way I passed a skinny young horse that seemed to be watching the gate I had to pass through. I said hello as I passed by, and kept following the road east.

Buckland's Station Loop
Trail greeter

Buckland's Station Loop
Almost back

Buckland's Station Loop
Time to load up

I finally reached the Highway again, just to the south of the bridge. Not seeing any big trucks on the horizon, I hurried across back to Buckland’s station and the end of the ride.

Buckland's Station Loop
The route

This was a fun loop with lots of opportunities for exploration. Even with drive time from Carson City, I still got it done in an afternoon. Even though I did this ride on my Fat Bike, it wasn’t so sandy that a regular mountain bike would have too much trouble (just stay out of the river bed!). There isn’t too much elevation gain, and it’s easy pedaling to get to the top. Rockhounders will enjoy the selenite crystals at the mine, and geocachers can find the many hidden caches along the route. Everyone will enjoy the ruins and history of Fort Churchill. There isn’t much shade in this area, and I was thankful to have my sun shirt and extra water on the ride. It still gets a bit warm out there, even in the Fall.

More photos of this ride here on Flickr.

Mountain Biking to Virginia City

Now that Autumn has arrived, it’s a great time to explore the areas east of Carson City. These trails and back roads can be impassable in the winter, muddy in the Spring, and too hot during the Summer. This time of year, though, the dry conditions and mild temperatures make it the perfect time to go. One of our favorite Fall rides is the off-road route up to Virginia City via the American Flat Toll Road. With the area’s fun and lively Old West history, this ride has started to become an annual event.

Carson City to Virginia City
Leaving Carson City

We met up at 9:00 AM at Centennial Park, and it had just warmed up enough to shed the jackets. We were treated to blue skies and plenty of sunshine, much better than last year when we started the ride in hazy smoke from the forest fires in California. Some of us had done the ride before, and for others it was the first time. And a few of us had never even met before. Nothing builds camaraderie like an outdoor adventure, though, and we’d all be friends by the end of the ride.

Carson City to Virginia City
Headed for Mound House

Leaving the back parking lot of Centennial Park, we started up the rocky, bumpy climb. Having just finished my coffee, it wasn’t the best way to begin the ride. At least this section is over quickly. The trail smoothed out for a relaxing climb toward Mound House, and we watched a group of paragliders take flight from a high point on McClellan Peak, landing in a flat spot near our trail.

Carson City to Virginia City
On the outskirts of Mound House

Once over the hill, we descended to the railroad tracks near Mound House, and followed trails and roads paralleling the tracks on the uphill side until we reached the water tower at the base of the American Flat Toll Road. Although just another dirt road now, these early toll roads were once profitable for the owners in the mid 1800s. Tolls of a few cents were collected for wagons, livestock, buggies, and horsemen on their way between Dayton, Virginia City, and Carson City.

Carson City to Virginia City
Preparing to climb American Flat Toll Road

The width of the toll road allowed for side-by-side riding and conversation. Talking bikes and trails always makes the climb go by easier. A few wild horses jumped across the road as we climbed, coming a little too close to a couple of the riders for a good startle! We regrouped at the top of the climb, where American Flat and Gold Hill were visible to the north.

Carson City to Virginia City
Arriving at American Flat

On our descent to American Flat, we paused at the railroad crossing. Down the tracks, we could see smoke billowing up from behind the hill. Just as we started to wonder if the train was coming or going, we began to hear the chugging of the steam engine. The train finally came into view, the rumbling grew louder, and the engineer blasted the whistle as he passed us. Dozens of passengers waved to us out the windows. It was a very powerful and awesome experience, and brought to mind many an old country song.

Carson City to Virginia City
The Virginia and Truckee Railroad – Can you hear the whistle blowing?

To cross American Flat, we descended through the valley past the United Comstock Merger Mill. Once described as the largest concrete mill in the United States, the mill was built in 1922 to process local gold and silver ore utilizing cyanide vat leaching. The mill only operated for six years, and was then abandoned. The mill’s machinery was dismantled and sold as salvage over the years, leaving only the eerie concrete walls and tunnels behind. The buildings are now closed to the public due to safety reasons, but you can still ride through the area on your way to Gold Hill.

Carson City to Virginia City
Passing by the United Comstock Merger Mill

Carson City to Virginia City
Nearing Gold Hill

We climbed up out of American Flat to the mine road that goes down to Gold Hill. This is the widest dirt road of the ride, but it’s best to keep to the right to stay out of the way of the frequent mining trucks that use the road. One of the mine workers was even nice enough to get on the radio to let everyone know we’d be coming down the road! The descent to Gold Hill is short lived, and then the steep climb up Route 342 begins, the first paved section of the ride.

Carson City to Virginia City
The steep climb up Gold Hill

Climbing up Gold Hill is the steepest part of the ride. We grinded up the grade, passing a few tempting signs advertising cold beer. Also along the road is the historic Gold Hill Hotel, the oldest, still existing hotel in Nevada. Claimed to be haunted by some, the Gold Hill Hotel has appeared on ghost hunter TV shows. We saw no paranormal activity on this day. Gold Hill’s population hovers around 200 people today, but once boasted a few thousand people back in the 70s. The 1870s, that is…

Carson City to Virginia City
RXR and a much needed rest

Thankfully, the gates closed as we approached the railroad crossing, and we were forced to stop and wait for the train. The short break gave me just enough strength to get to Homestead Road, the first right hand turn after crossing the tracks. This little side road follows the contour of the hill, and bypasses the remaining steep climb to the summit. From here, it’s just an easy ride over to the truck route (Route 341) and into Virginia City.

Carson City to Virginia City
Entering Virginia City

Riding into Virginia City is always exciting. The big climb is over, good food and drink await, and you never know what you’re going to see. On this day, custom motorcycles lined the streets, a banjo player was playing over a PA system, mobs of people roamed the boardwalk sidewalks, and the center of town was blocked off for outhouse races! There was activity everywhere.

Carson City to Virginia City
Well deserved beer and pizza at the Red Dog Saloon

As is customary, we headed to the north side of town to the Red Dog Saloon. There’s always good beer on tap here, and the pizzas are excellent. We lined up the bikes on the sidewalk outside the saloon, then went in for a couple rounds of drinks and two pizzas. Calories are your friend on this ride.

Carson City to Virginia City
Starting the journey home

After a relaxing lunch, we talked to a few motorcyclists, then headed back to main street to catch the outhouse races. The outhouses, mounted on big tricycles, had to drag race up the hill. The rider had help though, with a team of people running behind and pushing. It was crazy how fast these things moved up the street! When the racers took a break, we slowly worked our way through the crowd on our way to the south end of town. Bicycles really are a great way to get around the crowded streets of Virginia City.

Carson City to Virginia City
A busy Main Street

Carson City to Virginia City
Outhouse Races!

Carson City to Virginia City
A quick Pit Stop before the descent

Carson City to Virginia City
Top of Gold Hill

When we got to the top of Gold Hill, it was time for a fast road descent. The steep and twisty turns that we avoided on the way up, known as Greiner’s Bend, were a blast going down. Near the top, there was a car on my tail. By the time I hit the railroad tracks below, the car was no longer visible. I decided to slow down at that point. Especially since we saw horses indiscriminately crossing the road on the way up, and I had a turn onto a dirt road quickly approaching.

Carson City to Virginia City
About to descend the toll road

Rather than drop down to the the old mill site, we crossed American Flat near the middle so that we lost less elevation. It’s mostly an easy ride across, with only a steep section near the end to get up to the railroad crossing and top of the toll road. Once across American Flat, it was a nice long downhill on the toll road, followed by fun singletrack all the way to the end.

Carson City to Virginia City
Final descent to Centennial Park

Carson City to Virginia City
Wild Horses on the trail

Just before we got back to the trailhead, the trail took us between a few wild horses. They posed for a photo, then snorted as I cautiously passed by. It was a great ending to the Wild West ride, almost like the horses were saying, “Y’all come back now, ya hear?”. After I rest up, I reckon I will!